Brent Higham

15 May 2017

Brent came and saw me as a patient last week. He was more interested in showing me  some pictures on his cell phone  

than opening his mouth.

Anyway when I saw them I said "wow" and then asked him if  he could send me the Raw files so I can enhance them more .

I did this in Lightroom , Nik software (Dfine and Viveza) and then sent back the images to  Brents for his approval before publishing here.

I love astrophotography images  as it brings me back to the days of having a telescope in Blenheim and staying up late to view the night sky.

Now I'm too tired to even try to get out to a dark place and stay up late. Old age for ya. 

Thanks Brent for your wonderful image of Aurora Australis.

1.     22 April 2017     Pentax K1     iso3200     28mm     f2.8     20sec     Pentax 15-30mm f2.8

2.     22 April     iso 3200     17mm     f2.8     20sec

Comments

brent higham
Posted: 16 May 2017

i had spent all day around lake ferry and all places in between as the weather was incredibly calm ,so i decided to do some astrophotography as lake wairarapa was so flat.i had set up near an old pier when it had darkened .the 1st.shot was toward the south as the lake sprawled in front of me ,set the camera up on the tripod and used the settings f2.8 on the 15mm lens at i.s.o.3200 for 20 seconds.after the exposure i checked the image out and i knew then what i had captured,i was blown away could not believe my luck i had captured an aurora.it was a great surprise because you could not see anything with the naked eye to alert you to the aurora,i continued taking shots until it faded out 2 hours later.i have since learnt that you can predict when it may happen again so i will love to photograph the aurora again.

Chris Bing replies: Thanks Brent, fantastic result.

Eve Law
Posted: 19 May 2017

Wow Brent and Chris. These photos are fabulous. Its hard to believe that you couldn't see the aurora with the naked eye. The colours are stunning.

 

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Peter Leung

Peter Leung

Peter, photographing an out house

1 August 2015

I met Peter on the tour to the the Rice Terraces in China.

My first words to him was "do you speak Engrish?"

Joking aside we found we had so much in common.

Things like beautiful wives, love of chinese street food, previously employed by HK Govt, and the same camera!

Anyone who owns a Fuji 5s pro can't be that bad....... In fact nowadays unless you are an old timer you wouldn't have heard of the Fuji !  Peter was surprised I even knew about his camera. Peter was fanatical about sharpness and his pixels. He uses a tripod for most of his work and enjoys recording nature.

We were showing each other photos stored on our cell phones (as photographers do) - its a bit like I'll show you mine if you show me yours.......  Or, if you are showing off to a non photographer they always say "did you really take these shots with your cell phone? " Yeh I reply my HTC is really that good.... 

Anyway I enjoyed looking at these folllowing images that Peter showed me.

The student protest movement and the camping with tents in Central especially. The contrast of the small tents with the tall buildings in the background along with the HK flag next to the Chinese flag was very symbolic to me.

Apparently Peter did not even have my interpretation in mind when he took the shot.....

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Comments

Peter Leung
Posted: 1 Aug 2015

Nice meeting Sally and you in Kunming. Your zeal toward photography inspired me. Keep it up. It is something that enriches life. The effort of the zeal will be like rum for savouring from time to time. Love reading and watching the texts and photos of your blog. Keep it up. It certainly will turn out to be a pretty substantial backup for a book to be published in future. Keep 'spraying' and 'praying'.

Chris Bing replies: Thanks Peter, actually I am more snatch and grab.....
 

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Brents Boggy Pond

Brent

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James Fung

James Fung

James is a good friend of mine who happens to live in the same village as Sally.

When we met again in January 2015 he happened to aquire a car last year. James took the opportunity to take us around photographing places that are difficult to reach by public transport.  Thanks once again  James and Cee Cee for your hospitality.

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brent higham
Posted: 2 Jun 2015

what a lovely image very regal

 

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Richard Mayston

Richard Mayston

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Richard Mayston
Posted: 29 Oct 2014

5D² | Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Aspherical | 30 sec | ƒ/8 | ISO 100 A thunder storm brewing over the Cook Strait hit Wellington about 8.15pm. Spectacular lightning could be seen off Wellington's south coast as it approached. About 8.30pm, hail stones the size of marbles started hammering the city. MetService forecaster Stephen Glassey said the thunder storm formed about 5pm when a southerly and northerly wind converged, creating lift. I got the Samyang 14mm as a replacement Ultra Wide Angle when I upgraded from a Canon 40d to a Full Frame 5DmkII, an my EFS 10-22mm was rendered unusable. The Samyang 14mm is a rectilinear lens, and has met my expectations for sharpness. The moustache distortion is significant but lens profiles in LightRoom manage the situation. The 14mm on a FF enabled 114 degrees of coverage of the sky. With continuous 30sec exposures several lightning strikes where captured with relative ease. The Dominion Post published a large print on page 4 http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/wellington-weather/7513265/Lightning-storm-hits-Wellington quoting: Eastbourne resident Richard Mayston said it was some of the most dramatic lightning he had seen in 20 years and the thunder was so intense it shook his house. More photos at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/richardmayston/

 

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Ian Mc Ilrath

Ian Mc Ilrath

Comments

Ian McIlraith
Posted: 28 Jul 2014

Nikon D300, 18-200 @29mm; iso200, 1/200 @f/11. New Year's Day 2014, 5.30pm from the Routeburn Falls Hut on the Routeburn Track, Fiordland. It had been drizzling and misty all day, but cleared to reveal this magnificent view over the Routeburn Flats. The rainbow really was this vibrant, certainly the most spectacular rainbow I have ever seen. It lasted for quite a while, and the Hut emptied while people photographed it. This was only my second of the Great Walks, having done the Milford a few days before, starting on Christmas Day. I can now see what all the fuss is about - the scenery is truly breathtaking. Every one of us lucky enough to be living in this beautiful country should get out and experience these magnificent places!

Chris Bing replies: Ian, you can thank me for persuading you to take the big camera and not the point and shoot. What a great walk, I envy you.
 

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Ed Zuccollo

Ed Zuccollo

I saw Eds photos on his website.  I was impressed with his images considering he is recently into photography.

I always admire the view when driving along the Rimultakas but never get out. Thats the difference between old and jaded , as opposed to young and enthusiatic (and wet-I saw rainspots on his lens!).

Naturally I couldn't keep my itchy fingers off his file to do a bit of post processing. Ed called this "Rimutaka Rain (colour wash)". I'm afraid I took all his colour out!  He hasn't seen this yet. Will await his comments............

Comments

Ed Zuccollo
Posted: 3 Jul 2014

I like the B&W Chris! I see you've darkened the edges a lot more than I did - I liked the brilliance of the jagged cloud on the top but what you've achieved with just highlighting the sun ray through the rain is I think focus the attention a bit more on the main event. That rain texture is beautifully intricate. I think I'm going to have another go at developing it..

brent higham
Posted: 2 Jun 2015

wow love how the rain looks like a softly shaken white veil.I often stop to have a look but havnt caught it as dramaticly as this and Chris i like the treatment

 

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Ian Mc Ilrath

Ian Mc Ilrath

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Ian McIlraith
Posted: 18 Jun 2014

19 December 2013. D300, 18-200 @ 48mm. f/11 1/160s, iso320. Lake Onslow, Central Otago. After a long drive on a dirt road this was my first view of Lake Onslow. It is a man made lake at the head of the Teviot River, on which is a series of dams used for irrigation and small hydroelectric power generation. There are a few cribs clustered on the shore and the lake apparently provides very good trout fishing. Cold and windy on that morning.

 

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Gregory Young

Gregory Young

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Gregory Young
Posted: 3 Jun 2014

About This Image This is from my series Architectural Portraits My vision is to show the individual beauty and character of iconic and contemporary buildings that are the essence of our cityscapes. These grand buildings are what gives each city and town throughout the world their own unique finger print. I free the buildings from what I call environmental noise, that being, surrounding buildings, traffic, overhanging trolley bus lines and anything else that I feel takes away from the portrait. The images in this series to date have all been shot during the daytime and one image can be a combination of up to twenty shots knitted together. This collection is now being sold through the National Library of New Zealand in Wellington. You can see more of this collection here. http://gregoryyoungphotography.com/galleries/architectural-portraits/

brenthigham
Posted: 17 Jun 2014

what a great way to display the iconic buildings in wellington love it

Greg
Posted: 23 Jun 2014

Thank you Brent.

 

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Ian Mc Ilraith

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Ian McIlraith
Posted: 26 May 2014

Ian McIlraith
Posted: 26 May 2014

19 December 2013 D300, 18-200 @50mm, f/11 1/125s iso320 On the road to Lake Onslow which is in tussock country about 20km East of Roxburgh in Central Otago. A cold windy morning with snow on the Old Man Range across the Clutha River. A venerable working vehicle!

 

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Brent Higham

I met Brent when he sought dental treatment from me. We are still friends....

Anyway Brent is a very good photographer and he has a great eye. I always look forward to seeing his photographs.

Brent sent me an image of a swan and asked me my opinions on some filters he used post processing.

Personally I am not that keen on "art " filters and prefer photorealism. I asked Brent to send me the raw file and I will have a go with his shot.

Brent has a Pentax K3 and for an APS-C camera the sensor is very good. Its amazing how much information I could retrieve from his file.  Substantially more colour information  when compared to my  Olympus OMD sensor which is 4/3rds size but considered comparable to the larger APS-C file. Thats what the internet reviews say!

So here is my interpretation of his capture. I used Lightroom and Viveza (Nik Software). I think Brent hates it...

The Original

7 March 2014

Pentax K3  iso 100  250mm  f8.0  1/800sec   Pentax 60-250 f4

Comments

BrIan
Posted: 15 May 2014

I'm with Brent ... think he did a good job on it

brent
Posted: 16 May 2014

im afraid your right about me not liking what you have done you have removed the feel I was trying to portray which was the solitude of the swan on the water the heavy shadows and texture (not shown)around the swan designed to eliminate any visual distractions .I should publish the image on the web site so you can see what I mean

Chris Bing replies: Told you so.... Last thing you want is a busybody playing with your Raw files. I wasn't there to experience the emotion and feeling at the time. Those feelings will help dictate the post processing required and your interpretation of the scene.
 

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The Real Brent Higham

The Real Brent Higham

Brent took this photo a while ago and I always loved it. So here it is untouched by me...

Comments

Jon Ossher
Posted: 21 May 2014

Gorgeous photo of driftwood and beautiful panoramic water and sky. Also have to agree with Brett re: solitary swan. Dark, misty, haunting light supports a sense of solitariness, but also composure. The swan is completely okay being on his/her own.

 

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